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Montelirio. Un gran monumento megalítico de la Edad del Cobre

 

Miércoles, 19 de abril
Salón de actos, 18:30
Asistencia libre y gratuita

 

Ponentes:

 

• Carmen Cacho. Museo Arqueológico Nacional
• Marta Díaz-Zorita Bonilla. Universidad de Tübingen (Alemania)
• Primitiva Bueno Ramírez. Universidad de Alcalá de Henares
• Pedro Díaz del Río. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas.
• Corina Liesau. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
• Leonardo García Sanjuán. Universidad de Sevilla

 

This volume presents the results of the scientific study of the great Copper Age megalithic tomb of Montelirio (Castilleja de Guzmán, Sevilla, Spain), which was excavated between 2007 and 2010. The comprehensive study carried out in the last ten years by 45 specialists from 16 institutions of 5 different countries (Germany, New Zealand, Spain, United Kingdom and USA) includes de deployment of some of the cutting edge methods and techniques currently available to modern Archaeology. Altogether, the results reveal one of the most fascinating and yet enigmatic prehistoric monuments of the European continent, in which a predominantly female human contingent, accompanied by a remarkable set of grave goods, was buried. Some of the artefacts found in this tomb are unparallaled, as is the case with the sophisticated garnments made with thousands or perforated beads of stone and shell and decorated with ivory and amber. The countless details revealed by the meticulous research undertaken bring us close, with a detail previously unknown, to the life ways of Iberian Copper Age societies (c. 3200-2300 cal BC), particularly in what concerns their technology, craftsmanship, patterns of contact and exchange, social organisation and world views. With this study, Montelirio joins the small group of ‘classic” megalithic monuments of Andalusian, Iberian and European Late Prehistory while at the same time confirms the social and cultural eclosion that took place in the lower Guadalquivir valley in the third millennium BC, a true departure point por the genesis of modern-day Sevilla.